Free webseminars

Welcome to geneXplain’s free webseminars!

 

 

Upcoming webseminars:

 

Decoding non-coding genome: How and why mutations in TF binding sites may lead to cancer or cytokine storm?

This webseminar will be given live on December 9th, 2020, at 6 PM CET and will then be repeated with a live Q&A session on December 10th, 2020 at 10 AM CET.

The webseminar will be given by Dr. Alexander Kel, CSO geneXplain GmbH

We will open the registration to this webseminar shortly.

Webseminar brief summary

In this webseminar Dr. Alexander Kel will present his concept of the main principles of regulatory code. He will begin the lecture by discussing the puzzle of how non-coding genomic regions can regulate activity of thousands of genes in millions of different cellular conditions and how this regulation can go wrong in case of diseases, such as cancer and various forms of inflammatory diseases. Composite regulatory elements and modules that consist of several TF binding sites will become the focus of discussion giving a clue to the understanding the gene regulatory code. “Fuzzy puzzle” – is an analogy that will be used for such coding principle. Next, Dr. Kel will present the ideas about possible emerging of such fuzzy puzzle as a result of resolving the major limitations of evolution of multicellular organisms during the latest steps of evolution. Finally, results of computational analysis of non-coding genomic regions will be presented, describing how AI-driven algorithms can detect cancer-specific and inflammation-specific genomic and epigenomic alterations in composite regulatory modules helping to reveal novel mechanisms of disease progression leading to new avenues of research and ultimately to better diagnostic tests and personalized therapies.

 

Recent webseminars

 

In silico evaluation of the pharmacological potential of natural compounds

This webseminar was held on November 18th, 2020, at 6 PM CET and was then repeated due to multiple requests on November 24th, 2020, at 10 AM CET.

The webseminar was given by our invited speaker Prof. Vladimir Poroikov from the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry (IBMC), Moscow, Russia.

Webseminar brief summary

Natural products represent the auspicious source of medicines with improved safety and efficacy. In addition to their inherent biological activities provided as a “Gift of Mother Nature,” they exhibit substantial structural diversity that creates excellent opportunities to discover new pharmaceutical agents.

Medicinal plants are used in the traditional medicines of many countries. For example, Traditional Indian Medicine Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest medical sciences, with a history that goes back more than 5,000 years. The knowledge of Ayurveda has at various times had an impact on many branches of medicine, and it continues to retain its prominent position nowadays, being officially recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and enjoying great popularity in the US, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands.

The existing databases on natural products used in traditional medicines do not contain exhaustive information about natural products’ pharmacological potential.

At the webseminar Prof. Vladimir Poroikov demonstrated how new medical indications for medicinal plants’ phytoconstituents may be identified by applying bio- and chemoinformatics methods.

Several case studies were considered, including:

  1. Revealing medicinal plants useful for the comprehensive management of epilepsy and associated comorbidities.
  2. Repositioning of Achyranthes Aspera as an antidepressant agent.
  3. Discovery of the molecular mechanism of N-acetyl aspartate anti-aging action.

You are welcome to watch the video record of this webseminar:

 

 

TRANSFAC® database and its applications

This webseminar was held on October 21st, 2020.

The webseminar was given by Prof. Dr. Edgar Wingender, CEO of geneXplain GmbH, together with Dr. Volker Matys, customer support of geneXplain GmbH.

 

Webseminar brief summary:

The TRANSFAC® database is the gold standard in the area of transcriptional regulation. Dating back to a very early compilation, this database of eukaryotic transcription factors, their genomic binding sites and DNA-binding profiles has been carefully maintained and manually curated for over 30 years.

At the webseminar the founder and initiator of TRANSFAC® database Prof. Dr. Edgar Wingender, CEO of geneXplain GmbH, guided us though the historical origins, basic concepts and current status of gene regulation aspects in the context of TRANSFAC® database. Special emphasis was given to the recent developments of TRANSFAC® database, which fully address the latest needs of gene regulation studies.

The second part of the webseminar was presented by Dr. Volker Matys, who has been working on TRANSFAC® for more than twenty years and is currently in charge of customer support for TRANSFAC® at geneXplain GmbH. Dr. Volker Matys demonstrated TRANSFAC® applications for various biological research needs with focus on analysis of genomic sequences for potential transcription factor binding sites with the tools Match™ and FMatch.

You are welcome to watch the video record of this webseminar:

 

 

Transcription factors and their classification

This webseminar was held on September 16th, 2020, at 6 PM CEST

The webseminar was be given by Prof. Dr. Edgar Wingender
geneXplain GmbH, CEO
University Medical Center Göttingen, Institute of Bioinformatics (retired director)

 

Webseminar brief summary:

Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the gene activity program of a cell. They direct the RNA polymerase to the correct start site of transcription in a cell- and stage-specific way, frequently responding to extracellular stimuli.

Most TFs bind to DNA in a somewhat relaxed sequence-specific way, thereby decoding the regulatory signals of the genome. Comparative analysis of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) can be used (1) to establish a classification system for this important group of proteins; (2) to find a clue to decipher the DNA-protein recognition code; (3) to elucidate the evolutionary history of TFs; (4) to derive computational models for these DBDs that help identify orthologous TFs encoded by newly sequenced genomes and, thus, establish TF catalogs for these species.

This webseminar addressed the basic mechanism of transcription and features of transcription factors in eukaryotes, in particular their mode of recognizing regulatory DNA elements. The principles of a TF classification were outlined, their implementation as TFClass was depicted.

When applying these classification principles to different species, it has been revealed that TFs of some classes are instances of very old principles, whereas others are subject to very recent dynamic evolution.

You are welcome to watch the video record of this webseminar:

 

Regulatory SNPs in TRANSFAC® sites. Severe COVID-19 patients versus non-symptomatic.

This webseminar was held on August 5th, 2020

The webseminar was given by geneXplain’s CSO Dr. Alexander Kel.

Webseminar brief summary:

More then 90% of disease-linked SNPs are non-coding. So, they are located outside of the protein coding regions of genome and often mark the genomic regions that regulate genes whose aberrant expression leads to dysfunction of signal transduction or metabolic pathways leading to the elevated disease susceptibility or severity. Such regulatory SNPs are difficult to interpret since the regulatory code is still purely understood.  Regulatory SNPs are often associated with DNA sequence variations that effect transcription factor bindings sites (TFBSs), which leads to the change in regulation of the target genes. We used TRANSFAC® database and the geneXplain® platform with the automatic omics analysis tool Genome Enhancer to analyze TFBS of SNPs revealed in GWAS study in the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative, which is a global initiative to elucidate the role of host genetic factors in susceptibility and severity of the SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic. Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 28, 715–718 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41431-020-0636-6.

We revealed TFBSs (for such TFs as FOXO1, TCF3, E2F1, TP53) strongly associated with SNPs linked with the severity of COVID-19 disease. Upstream analysis of these TFs in the context of the reveled SNPs gave us a clue about signal transduction pathways associated with the potential predisposition to the severe COVID-19 disease.

You are welcome to watch the video record of this webseminar:

 

COVID-19 Challenge: Known unknowns and unknown unknowns in biological activity spectra of the current and emerging pharmaceutical agents

This video is a record of geneXplain’s live webseminar ‘COVID-19 Challenge: Known unknowns and unknown unknowns in biological activity spectra of the current and emerging pharmaceutical agents’ which was held on June 24th, 2020.

This webseminar was given by our invited speaker, Prof. Vladimir Poroikov from the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry (IBMC), Moscow, Russia.

At the webseminar Prof. Vladimir Poroikov showed how to apply human intelligence and machine learning methods to in silico analysis of biological activity profiles of the launched and investigational drugs currently proposed for the pharmacotherapy of multifaceted clinical manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Particular emphasis was placed on PharmaExpert software that analyzes the biological activity spectra predicted by PASS taking into account the relationships between different biological activities, and identifies the pleiotropic effects of drug combinations and preparations of medicinal plants.

 

COVID-19 Challenge: In silico approach to finding potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 agents among one billion molecules

This video is a record of geneXplain’s live webseminar ‘COVID-19 Challenge: In silico approach to finding potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 agents among one billion molecules’ which was held on May 13th, 2020.

This webseminar was given by our invited speaker, Prof. Vladimir Poroikov from the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry (IBMC), Moscow, Russia.

At the webseminar Prof. Vladimir Poroikov showed how to apply artificial intelligence and machine learning methods to in silico screening of hits with the desired biological activity in chemical libraries of synthesized or virtual molecules.

Particular emphasis was placed on PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances), one of the earliest and most widely used software for the elucidation of hidden pharmacological potential of drug-like molecules.

 

COVID-19 – online discovery of prospective drug targets and personalized treatments with Genome Enhancer

This video is a record of geneXplain’s live webseminar ‘COVID-19 – online discovery of prospective drug targets and personalized treatments with Genome Enhancer’ which was held on April 29th, 2020.

In this video geneXplain’s CSO Dr. Alexander Kel is performing the analysis of personalized transcriptomics data coming from bronchoalveolar lavage of certain COVID-19 patients using the Genome Enhancer software.

 

COVID-19 – online discovery of prospective drug targets and treatments with Genome Enhancer

This video is a record of geneXplain’s live webseminar ‘COVID-19 – online discovery of prospective drug targets and treatments with Genome Enhancer’ which was held on April 7th, 2020.

In this video geneXplain’s CSO Dr. Alexander Kel is performing the integrated analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics datasets of COVID-19 patient data in search for prospective drug targets and treatments using the Genome Enhancer software.

Thank you for your interest in our webseminars!

If you have any suggestions for new topics of our webseminars, please let us know via info@genexplain.com, and maybe your topic will be selected for one of the next webseminars!

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